Posts Tagged ‘ Recipes ’

647 Secret Sauce & Buttermilk Slider Rolls

Jun 1st, 2012 | By

These recipes accompany the Muffin Tin Sliders which was printed in the Summer 2012 issue of Northeast FLAVOR. 647 Secret Sauce INGREDIENTS 1/4 cup mayonnaise 1/4 cup finely chopped dill pickles, drained well 2 tablespoons Dijon or spicy brown mustard 2 tablespoons ketchup 1/2 teaspoon sugar, or more to taste Freshly cracked black pepper, to
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[April] Shad and Shad Roe

Apr 2nd, 2012 | By
[April] Shad and Shad Roe

Shadadelic, Baby!! Massachusetts may have its sacred cod but Connecticut has shad. Although only designated as the state fish in 2003, shad was an important food source long before the first settlers landed on New England shores. Native Americans saw shad as a seasonal gift and were known to have large springtime gatherings to roast
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[March] Boiled Dinner: a New England Mainstay

Mar 7th, 2012 | By
[March] Boiled Dinner: a New England Mainstay

Boiled dinners have historically been a staple in the New England diet. But what, exactly, is a boiled dinner? It’s all in the name: corned beef and root vegetables— carrots, onions, celery, turnips or beets, and cabbage— cooked in boiling water until tender. “The boiled dinner has the Yankee straightforwardness that’s characteristic of so much
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Boiled Dinner Recipes

Mar 2nd, 2012 | By

Wayside Boiled Dinner Eric Burkholter of the Wayside Restaurant, in Berlin, Vermont, just outside of Montpelier, notes that their boiled dinners have been a menu staple for years. INGREDIENTS 2 to 5 pounds corned beef 2 turnips 2 carrots 2 beets 1 medium head green cabbage 2 to 3 russet potatoes METHOD 1. Put corned
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A Cure for Cabin Fever!

Feb 10th, 2012 | By
A Cure for Cabin Fever!

This winter, we’ve enjoyed mild weather in New England — a lovely and welcome change! But that doesn’t mean we’re immune from Cabin Fever. There are cold snaps, head colds, dark days, and a smattering of snow here and there. The groundhog has seen his shadow, so we’re in for six more weeks of winter
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Basic New England Chowder

Feb 10th, 2012 | By
Basic New England Chowder

  Basic New England Chowder This simple chowder, featured on our Spring 2012 cover, packs a whole lot of options. Mix and match the fish to make it your own. Leave out the dairy to make a clear (Rhode Island) chowder. The recipe’s author, food historian Sandy Oliver, is working on a cookbook, Maine Home
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Swiss Chard Dip

Jan 23rd, 2012 | By
Swiss Chard Dip

Swiss Chard Dip Swiss Chard leaves (5–6), steamed 8 ounces sour cream 8 ounces cream cheese 1 teaspoon smoked paprika A pinch of salt 1. Combine all ingredients in a food processor and blend until chard is minced. 2. Serve chilled with sliced cucumbers or slices of baguette. Makes 1 1/2 to 2 cups. From
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Braised Beet Greens

Jan 23rd, 2012 | By

Braised Beet Greens 1 pound beet greens 1 small onion, chopped fine 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/4 cup water or chicken stock Salt and pepper Your favorite vinegar 1. In a skillet, heat the oil and cook the onion until translucent. 2. Cut or tear the beet greens and add them to the skillet. Toss
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Portuguese Sausage and Kale Soup

Jan 23rd, 2012 | By
Portuguese Sausage and Kale Soup

Portuguese Sausage and Kale Soup INGREDIENTS 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups Portuguese sausage (linguica or chourico), about 14 ounces, sliced 1/2 inch thick 1 medium onion, chopped 2 large potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/2 inch cubes 1/4 cup minced fresh parsley 1 tablespoon minced fresh garlic 10 to 12 cups unsalted chicken stock or
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Winter Greens

Jan 23rd, 2012 | By
Winter Greens

VARIETIES Winter greens, depending on your region, include beet tops, kale, chard, mustard, bok choy, spinach, and collards. When the weather turns cold, the glucose in the leaves  can’t reach the roots thus causing the bitter greens of summer to become the sweet greens of winter. WHY YOU SHOULD TRY In winter months we tend
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